Through a hand-camera’s eyes…

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I started filming some of my first ideas for a film on a Fuji camera. And the directions to use it have been misplaced. I ended up uploading the videos on my computer, some very small clips that I filmed. Didn’t think about the cell phone. Didn’t think about the camera-part, really. I just started taking videos of some of the areas I was interested in. Some of the areas are Sutter and Colusa County, California. There’s a unique bridge and many water-ways. I have to figure out how to edit and connect the segments on my computer. Some of my efforts were a bit jerky–that I either filmed a small clip too fast and some of the weather, the wind, to be more specific, made my camera time difficult. But, then, again, it’s the first time out for creating some time on video, and I was trying to figure out what the heck I was doing while enjoying doing it, which I did. I don’t think you have to take a film class to try and figure it out, what you’re looking for exactly, but I’m sure with the equipment it’s pretty helpful.
Denny’s helps. So there I was: weeds, sticks, dirt. A Few homes. Cows. Horses. Migrating creeks. Abandoned homes.

Some intriguing. Some creepy. But there was volume in each–and is volume in each. I’m planning on going out again–and I do really need a better film/camera option, but to see the wind blow leaves and to hear the sound of it in first playing it back, I hadn’t been that surprised in a long time. So, I’ve got quite a few very short videos to look through and decipher. I found out some interesting history about a deceased relative in that he frequented Colusa County quite a bit during rice harvest season–the many houses, the many stopovers he made just to sleep before the car ran out of gas. This, too, will be a project based on him in the future, although it’ll take me to Oklahoma, parts of Sacramento and other places tracing where he went to. Arbuckle, also, is an interesting city in Colusa County. It’s uniquely small, an eyesore if given the time. A cemetery with no name, railroad tracks introduce it. There’s a bar, however, called The Arbuckle Bar, and I was also able to discover the section/chair my late grandfather sat in. This was around, I want to say, 1936 or so–a few years after leaving Oklahoma for Sacramento. As for the camera, I’ve got to figure out some editing and tracking development to see where I’m yet going with it, which will help the writing of the screenplay in being more of a visual person.